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Development by:
Chinook Track and Field

Sunday April 20 2014


[ JAVELIN ] [ SHOT PUT ] [ HAMMER ] [ DISCUS ]
[ GENERAL TRAINING ]

This area of our web site is dedicated to providing an area for the sharing of coaching and training tips and information. If you wish to contribute or if you have questions to ask of others then this is the place for it. Below, we have started with the seven biomechanical principles applied to throwing or as they are sometimes referred to, the "Seven Commandments". If you wish to contribute to this repository, please use our submission form. If you have a specific question that you would like answered then you can use our discussion line to ask questions in an open forum.

Basic Throwing Principles


1. In all four throwing events the distance obtained is dependent upon the speed, the angle, and the height of release of the implement. Aerodynamic factors also affect the javelin and the discus.

2. Involve the entire body while achieving a long range of motion. The goal of the thrower is to exert the forces of the entire body over the greatest distance possible, and for the longest period of time.

3. Achieve a summation of forces. Each lever used in the throw must move faster than the previous lever, with each lever moving faster in the direction of the throw than the implement. To obtain this maximum contribution to speed, the stronger, larger, but slower muscles must be used first (thighs, trunk); followed by the weaker, smaller, but faster muscles of the arms, hands, feet, and lower legs. Although there is a sequence involved, it is imperative that all the forces be applied as simultaneously as possible.

4. The various forces of the body should be exerted in a definite sequence and with proper timing. These forces should be applied in the direction of the throw.

5. As a general rule in throwing, there is more horizontal drive than lift in the preliminary movements; in the delivery there is more lift than drive. The athlete has to master a balance between the two while applying forces in the proper direction.

6. For maximum speed of release the ground must provide adequate resistance to the thrower's movements for as long as he/she is in contact with the implement.

7. Center of gravity over base. During the application of force, the athlete has to have his feet in the correct position, and achieve a balance for a maximum contribution.


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